Green Living

Back to School for Grown-ups

We’ve taken everything you most enjoyed as a school-bound kid and updated it with healthy, adult twists.

Back to School for Grown-ups
Pin it Dominick Guillemot

If you loved: BACK-TO-SCHOOL SHOPPING FOR THE LATEST LOOKS
Now try: SPRUCING UP YOUR WARDROBE WITH KEY ORGANIC PIECES

The annual September trip to the mall to buy a few special outfits— including a cool look for the first day of school—is a childhood memory most of us share. Now, we tend to buy clothes as we need (or want!) them. But style experts agree that no matter how often or infrequently you go shopping, fall is a great time to take stock—and do a little revamp if necessary. This season, multifunctional designs (think: drawstrings and reversibility), transitional looks and easycare sustainable garments that help reduce excess energy and water consumption and eliminate toxic dry cleaning are popular trends.

When shopping organic, it’s more essential for some fabrics to boast the eco-friendly label than others. “Organic cotton is most important, because cotton crops are normally cultivated with harmful herbicides, pesticides and toxic petro-chemical fertilizers,” says Howard Brown, co-founder of Stewart + Brown, a sustainable fashion line. Hemp or linen, however, is not a certified organic fiber because it’s naturally resilient and grown without the aid of herbicides and pesticides. Because few of us choose to stock our entire wardrobe with organic clothes, opt for organic fabrics for items that will be worn close to the skin (such as camisoles, T-shirts and jeans). Another health-friendly detail: Look for brands that pre-wash their clothes to eliminate harmful contaminants and allergens, such as chlorine and formaldehyde, which may be used in the dyeing process.

Finally, opt for eco-conscious brands if you want to know that farmers, workers and the environment aren’t exposed to toxic chemicals during the creation of your clothing and that the companies are part of the solution in creating a healthy world for children and future generations. “It feels good to know nothing was harmed or exploited to produce your clothing,” says Brown

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